Joaquin Phoenix Says He Didn’t Produce “King Push”

Did Joaquin Phoenix lie to Kanye about producing Pusha’s album intro?Today XXL breaks the story that Joaquin actually passed the beat along from his boy’s son who made it in Garage Band (I’m speculating).

“While it was widely reported that Pusha T used my beat and that I produced his song, I can’t take any credit,” he said. ”A friend’s son played me his music, and all I did was make an introduction to Kanye’s camp.”

Everybody knows Phoenix likes to fuck with people’s heads. Maybe he’s fucking with us now? If I remember correctly, Kanye corroborated Pusha’s original story about Joaquin producing the beat during his Zane Lowe interview, so I would gather that he actually did believe that the actor produced the beat. I guess the next question would be: who is this anonymous kid who’s making top tier beats with no credit?

Previously: Pusha T Has a Joaquin Phoenix Beat on His Album


AddThis Social Bookmark Button

One Response to “Joaquin Phoenix Says He Didn’t Produce “King Push””

  1. gramMasta Says:

    NEW YORK (AP) — A hidden website operated by a San Francisco man using an alias from “The Princess Bride” became a vast black market bazaar that brokered more than $1 billion in transactions for illegal drugs and services, according to court papers made public on Wednesday in New York.

    A criminal complaint in New York charged the alleged mastermind, Ross William Ulbricht, with narcotics trafficking, computer hacking and money laundering. A separate indictment in Maryland also accused him in a failed murder-for-hire scheme.

    The website, Silk Road, allowed users to anonymously browse through nearly 13,000 listings under categories like “Cannibus,” ”Psychedelics” and “Stimulants” before making purchases using the electronic currency Bitcoin. One listing for heroin promised buyers “all rock, no powder, vacuum sealed and stealth shipping,” and had a community forum below where one person commented, “Quality is superb.”

    The website protected users with an encryption technique called “onion routing,” which is designed to make it “practically impossible to physically locate the computers hosting or accessing websites on the network,” court papers said.

    Federal authorities shut the site down and arrested Ulbricht on Tuesday afternoon in a branch of San Francisco’s public library. Ulbricht was online on his personal laptop chatting with a cooperating witness about Silk Road when FBI agents from New York and San Francisco took him into custody, authorities said.

    ^ ironic how this conversation was on nah not that long ago

Leave a Reply