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Havoc – Say Goodbye

Another day, another underwhelming Hav freestyle.

Havoc – Say Goodbye

Props to Mr. X

Previously:  Havoc – Fully Loaded Clip Freestyle


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8 Responses to “Havoc – Say Goodbye”

  1. A tribe called quest aka No Draws unda Im Big Brotha Thunda Says:

    Wow @ shyne, will anyone care what shyne does when he comes out?

    No shots just wondering

  2. The One And Only Says:

    # dee Says:
    August 3rd, 2009 at 7:07 pm

    I don’t even wanna imagine the lyrical heat that shyne is gonna unleash early next year. 8 1/2 years of nothing but writing? You know little nigga’s got a whole trunkload of songs / concepts / stories to tell.

    *stans it up*

    ^^

    Dude’s about to get all up in Diddy’s ass. *pause*

  3. AmpGeez a.k.a. Dro Jackson Says:

    This is embarassing.

  4. The Shot Clock aka Guns is me Says:

    so you’re agreeing with me then.

    what u said before was that hip hop culture drives America from the ground up and i think thats a massive overstatement. i mean what does that even mean?

    ^

    Well, I mean that you’ve got (this is gonna get technical, but bear with me) a segment of the population who are taste-makers who shape styles (this is, to me, a lot of the people who shape the music, fashion, and attitudes of hip-hop) and a segment of the population who produce things that those taste-makers either accept or reject.

    I think those taste-makers are logically the lower rungs, because they largely can’t make the stuff, so they’re the ground-up part of culture, and that the higher rungs are dictating culture by creating the framework of it.

    So, yes, I’m sort of agreeing with you, but I think that we underestimate the power of the youth culture to make things popular or valuable. Part of the reason baseball’s falling off, for example, is just because basketball’s been rising for 30 years as the birth rate has been rising. More kids have grown up playing basketball (or football, but that’s not the point) in the last two decades than in the 1970s and 80s by dint of there just being more kids in the last two decades.

    This year (I think this stat’s still true, though it’s a little old) will be the third straight year to set a record for most high school graduates nationwide. That’s a critical mass of 16-20-year-olds.

    ^

    but u seem to be equating american entertainment with america itself. for the people who drive america from the bottom up hip hop is recreation, maybe a source of motivation but, they’re too busy workin, studyin, and hustlin

  5. Black Says:

    A tribe called quest aka No Draws unda Im Big Brotha Thunda Says:

    August 3rd, 2009 at 7:14 pm
    Wow @ shyne, will anyone care what shyne does when he comes out?

    No shots just wondering

    ^^^Eh.. prolly not. The game has changed tremendously since homie went away. I don’t doubt that he’ll be able to get a deal if thats what he wants though. His story should’ve been a lesson to remy Ma though. You do 5 or more years in hip-Hop and that is essentially career suicide.

  6. A tribe called quest aka No Draws unda Im Big Brotha Thunda Says:

    Remy Ma committed career suicide when she thought she could rap without the help of pun

  7. I AM GERALD SALUTI Says:

    anybody got a link for that new tony yayo wit the ill beat sample. I think its momma or some shit like that..

  8. Rockabye Says:

    but u seem to be equating american entertainment with america itself. for the people who drive america from the bottom up hip hop is recreation, maybe a source of motivation but, they’re too busy workin, studyin, and hustlin

    ^

    Okay, I see that.

    But I’m talking not just hip-hop as a product but the hip-hop lifestyle informing choices people make. No, American culture isn’t entirely hip-hop, but there’s a huge swath of people aged 0-30 (born in 1979 to now) who are engaged with our entertainment culture more heavily than people were in 1979 or 1999, and a lot of that has to do with hip-hop.

    Things got portable and cheaper: You have music not just to sit and listen to but to take with you, and you’re paying less for it (downloads) or for smaller chunks of it (ringtones, singles).

    Things got more personal: A defining characteristic of hip-hop is the authentic voice of the artist. That’s partly pushback against white music of the ’70s and the packaged Motown sound of the late ’60s, and partly because a lot of hip-hop is storytelling that has to be believable to be worthwhile. The idea that even hip-hoppers aspire to be “rock stars” to this day (Weezy) should tell you something about the disconnect between rock and the average American, but the point is that we’re all about everyone taking their own slices of culture and holding them dear, and hip-hop is better suited to that personalization and personal connection.

    And, most importantly, things got faster: Rappers are their own entities and have been brought up in a culture determined to do things faster, if not always better, than the next guy, which makes them more agile for a world in which commentary on stuff or newness for the sake of newness are almost currency.

    All of those things, in turn, have helped the hip-hop culture seep into the rest of culture, I think.

    Sorry for the essay.

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